Sunday, July 26, 2009

Falling In Love With Reading

Check out Pamela's blog about her daughter falling in love with reading. Beautiful!

What book did you fall in love with as a kid? Or an adult? I don't remember being a kid, so I'll just share the book that affected me most: The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.

5 comments:

Pamela Hammonds said...

Funny that it just hit me now, reading your post, that I hadn't thought about what book changed me. I think it happened in middle school but I can't remember the name of the book. It was a series about sisters and I believe one was a nurse.

Like you--much of my childhood is a fog! I've tried over the years to remember what they were called, but since they were from my school library and I never owned them, I really have no way of knowing.

I never remember a time in my life when I didn't have a book handy. I'm always reading something. I can't imagine a life without books.

Susan Poulos said...

Joan, you mentioned Poisonwood and I have to add The Bean Trees, also by BK. I just read it this weekend for the first time, and I have to say that I am STILL falling in love with books (like this one) all over again. Pamela- great post on Mia falling in love with a book. It doesn't get much better than that!

Joan Mora said...

Pamela--I don't know that one, but I just remembered two more, not from childhood, but from my teen years. The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton and The Trouble with Angels by Jane Trahey (also, it made a great movie with Rosalind Russell as Mother Superior).

Susan--Thanks for stopping by. I've never read The Bean Trees, I'll have to try it.

About Me said...

I don't remember much of what I read until Little Women as a freshman or sophomore in high school. In my later years I prefer biography or nonfiction. Recently, I read Hermoine Lee's biography of Edith Wharton...after that The Dark Side by Jane Mayer. The Poisonwood Bible was one of the best, along with the Secret Life of Bees.

Shirley

mary-lucille said...

Oddly enough the two greatest favourites were American: Little Women & What Katy did at School, though I also liked Heidi. (My sis & I still write to our Mother as 'marmee'.)

Apart from Black Beauty, my favourite British novel for children was The Secret Garden which I still like. (One chap I'd been v taken with immediately discounted himself as a prospect when he dismissed it as 'mawkish'!)

The appeal of most of these books was projection of some sort - no dishonour in that - I especially identified with the obnoxious Mary in TSG as I was not well-socialised with other children so, to my shame, took refuge myself in behaving as though I were above all the others...